DavidCrace
  • Male
  • Brentwood, TN
  • United States
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  • Gunnar Branson
  • Ted L Simon
  • Alexandra Hobson
  • Preston Samuels
  • Michael B. Moore
 

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Profile Information

Title
Divisional CMO
Company
EMI Music
Company Summary
We create, market, distribute and publish music and artist brands. We impact culture for good.
LinkedIn
http://linkedin.com/in/davidcrace
Twitter
http://twitter.com/DavidCrace
Facebook or other
http://davidcrace.blogspot.com/
BIO
I grew up in the South in a family of serial entreprenuers. I fell in love with marketing in high school and have followed that muse through college, graduate school and across my career.

I have an MBA from The Fuqua School of Business at Duke, have worked in Brand Management at Procter & Gamble and Coca-Cola, and for the last decade I have been marketing music for EMI. Currently I am CMO/SVP of a Division of EMI Music in Nashville. My role includes business development, enterprise strategy, and all things sales & marketing (vision, strategy, tactics).

I enjoy bringing brand management philosophies to life in new businesses and channels. Music consumers led me into technology a decade ago where I have become passionately engaged in all things digital.

I'm a strategy-first marketer and believe consumer-based marketing is central to all functions of a business. I hope to continue working in senior leadership roles for organizations that share that vision.

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DavidCrace's Blog

Emotional Benefits: Group vs Self Identity

To pick up from the previous post, we are all motivated by the goal for self actualization, but self-actualization can only be achieved after we have met our "social needs" and "esteem needs". Social needs refer to our desire to belong, to have friends, to be in a group, to have community. Esteem needs refer to our desire for self identity, self respect, and independence from a group. Group identity vs self identity. The emotional benefit of any brand "ladders" up to these higher order… Continue

Posted on October 7, 2009 at 9:49pm

Emotional Needs: Hello Maslow

Brand builders continue to primarily rely on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs as a conceptual framework for understanding the motivation of their consumers. In a nutshell, this model proposes that all emotional needs “ladder up” to our ultimate pursuit for self actualization. Read more here.



A fair amount of academic debate continues on what the hierarchy looks like after physiological needs are met.… Continue

Posted on October 1, 2009 at 7:03am — 1 Comment

Emotional Benefits

When consumers interact with a brand, there is an emotional consequence. Brand failure, even in the most insignificant categories, can cause frustration, anger, even embarrassment. Brand success can lift spirits and turn a bad day around. What’s interesting is these emotional consequences are often not just directed at the brand, but at the user. Ever felt like a sucker for buying a brand? Ever felt more confident about yourself when using a brand?



As a brand builder, the goal is to… Continue

Posted on September 25, 2009 at 7:30pm — 2 Comments

On Performance

When evaluating performance, marketers often make two mistakes: (1) relying solely on technical testing to evaluate performance & (2) too narrowly defining the performance window.



Most marketers trying to make a superiority claim end up spending an inordinate amount of time with their legal department. The legal department requires technical proof that a product performs significantly better on a performance dimension (e.g., cleans better) than competition. Elaborate test are… Continue

Posted on September 22, 2009 at 8:21pm — 1 Comment

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At 2:27am on October 6, 2009, Ted L Simon said…
HI David. Thanks for the invite. Looking forward to exchanging thoughts with you here on the Farm.
 
 
 

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